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Adobe Premiere Pro CS6

Adobe Premiere Pro CS6 Feature Predictions

A Vancouver Videographer’s Top 6 predictions

 

for Adobe Premiere Pro CS6

 

Adobe Premiere Pro CS6

Last year was a good one for Adobe. Long time rival Apple and its Final Cut Pro video editing software program arguably left the professional video editing market when they announced Final Cut X at NAB. Well it wasn’t technically at NAB but it was during NAB and in Las Vegas a short monorail ride away from the Las Vegas Convention Centre.

The exit of Final Cut from the professional video editing market and the fact that Adobe Premiere Pro has benefitted from 64 bit architecture and GPU acceleration since 2010’s CS5, led to an increase in market share for Adobe in 2011.


With less than three weeks to go before Adobe is going to publicly announce updates to the entire Production Premium Suite of applications, video editors have been speculating as to what features Adobe will add in an already impressive and integrated suite of video editing applications. CS5 was the last time the entire suite was upgraded, in CS5.5 some of the applications, like Adobe Encore, only received bug fixes.

I’m about to sign a non-disclosure agreement that will prevent me from sharing all that Adobe tells me. The embargo ends 12:01 AM on April 23rd, although there will be a soft-launch of teasers April 16th, the day when NAB 2012 opens its trade show doors to the public. So before Adobe tells me anything I wanted to take a guess at what we will see in Adobe Premiere Pro CS6.

Here are my Top 6 Adobe Premiere Pro CS6 Feature Predictions:

1) More speed:

CS5 benefitted from 64bit architecture and GPU acceleration when paired with a few approved NVIDIA CUDA cards. CS5.5 added additional cards to the list but at the same time they got Premiere to run faster with the existing CUDA cards. I expect Adobe to get even faster on same system performance and unlocking additional real-time GPU accelerated effects.

2) More support:
This kind of goes with the above but I’d love to see Adobe Premiere Pro CS6 support the new NVIDIA GTX680 video cards. The GTX680 has over 1,536 CUDA cores, which is three times the 512 that the current single processor core-count champ, the GTX580, has. Higher CUDA counts directly correlate to faster render times but I should note that the GTX680 no longer has pixel shaders and the CUDA cores now handle this processing. So part of me thinks that the GTX680 could either be much faster than the GTX580 while a part of me feels that this new GPU architecture might not result in faster video editing speeds until Adobe has a bit more time with this new Kepler class of graphics cards.

Workstation Quadro cards, while promoted heavily by both Adobe and NVIDIA, don’t perform as fast as the GeForce line of “gaming” cards. Premiere already added support in Premiere Pro CS5.5.2 for a Quadro + Tesla C2075 pairing, which they call a Maximus configuration, so I also predict that Adobe might finally support multiple GPUs in this launch. In my most recent round of testing on my new hex-core Core i7 3930K system one of my benchmarks suggested to me that with enough CPU power, the GPU might be my new bottleneck and either supporting a video card with more CUDA cores or multiple GPUs (or both) might be the next logical step for Adobe.

3) Better export presets:

Since CS5 I’ve been complaining that the default presets, with their arbitrary and fixed frame rates, were both an easy fix for Adobe and the cause of unnecessary additional rendering time. Most importantly they are technically workflow mistakes. The problem is that the presets have seemingly random frame rates and no mechanism to force the otherwise good preset to match the sequence frame rate. It wasn’t uncommon for a video to be filmed in 29.97 fps, edited correctly in 29.97 fps, and then accidentally exported to a completely different frame rate like 23.97 fps of even the odd-ball 30.0 fps because that is what the export preset for Vimeo or YouTube defaults too. Some might argue that it is up to the user to adjust the preset settings to match their workflow but the truth is that many users, including some Adobe certified instructors likely don’t know they are making this mistake – I have seen the presets applied in online videos and live demonstrations incorrectly many times and other than myself, I have never heard of anyone discussing this problem in online forums or in training videos so this leads me to believe that this mistake happens more often than not.
The fix: Make the presets so that they automatically match the sequence frame rate (and can still be overridden like they currently are) or add a little check box (similar to the match sequence settings one) so users can do it themselves.

4) Update Encore:
Encore is still a 32bit application and doesn’t fully support GPU acceleration. The partial support is provided via Adobe Media Encoder for the video rendering but motion menus aren’t. I would also like to see Encore add export options for their slide show feature to 1080P H.264 video. A flash export option exists but it is limited to 720P and the On2 VP6 codec. And while I’m at it, I’d like to see the slideshow either be a Premiere native feature or dynamic linkable to Premiere so that a master copy of the slide show can be created – currently with every new disc burned from within Encore the slide show is re-rendered from scratch. If no changes are made, the slide show should not require re-rendering.

5) Update OnLocation:
Right now OnLocation is obsolete in my workflow because I don’t shoot with DV or HDV anymore and the new computer I’m building for CS6 doesn’t even have a Firewire connection. I’d like to see a new OnLocation that allows HDMI or HD-SDI capture and monitoring with scopes when paired with hardware from Aja, Blackmagic Design, or Matrox. The old OnLocation was a bit ahead of its time anyways. I never really could get it to work reliably on my laptop because they have always featured a single hard drive and could not sustain the write speeds required for basic DV or HDV. Even my current Core i7 ASUS G51J laptop only has a single spinning hard drive and although it does great for field video editing, it drops the occasional frame when I capture video for extended periods of time.

6) New Features from Acquisitions:
Adobe bought IRIDAS in September 2011 so expect Production Premium CS6 to add advanced color grading, HDR, and RAW video support. I also predict Adobe will add 3D video support and background rendering.

2011 BCPVA VIA awards – in the news

Last month I was attending the National Association of Broadcasters trade show in Las Vegas on behalf of the BCPVA and EventDV Magazine. As a BCPVA delegate I was charged with selecting BCPVA Video Innovation Awards. A month later, news of the awards has spread across the internet, and the world, with reports from USA, Australia, and Japan.

Awards were presented to Sony, Blackmagic Design, K-Tek, Adobe, and Atomos.

Check-out the BCPVA blog for a few the reports:
http://www.bcpva.com/topics/news/awards/2011-bcpva-via-awards-in-the-news/

And below is a sample, from Sony’s Australian website:

Sony Australia

NEX-FS100P 2011 Wins VIA Award at NAB 2011.
The British Columbia Professional Videographers Association presented Sony with the 2011 BCPVA Video Innovation Award for the NEX-FS100P.

The 2011 BCPVA VIA was presented to Jeff Ibbotson, Senior Vice President, Professional Solutions Group, by BCPVA delegate Shawn Lam, at NAB 2011.

The NEX-FS100P is a super 35 sensor interchangeable lens HD video camera with professional XLR audio inputs. The super 35 sensor allows the FS100 to attain superior low light sensitivity and a sought-after bokeh, or defocus. The FS100 improves on the problems that DSLR camera operators have been limited by, including moire, aliasing, rolling shutter, 12 minute record limits, lack of data-display-less HDMI record out, and egonomics.

The British Columbia Videographers Association is Canada’s largest non-profit professional video association and its members specialise in event, corporate, and wedding videography.

BCPVA Video Innovation Awards at NAB 2011

While working the Las Vegas Convention Centre floors for NAB, the video industry’s largest trade show, I had two important roles.  I was representing EventDV Magazine & EventDV Live as a contributing editor and product reviewer and at the same time, the BC Professional Videographers Association, as the delegate in charge of the new BCPVA Video Innovation Awards.

In total I awarded five Video Innovation Awards to companies who announced products that are game changers for our membership, comprised of corporate and even video producers and small business owners.  Here is what I wrote on the BCPVA blog regarding the 2011 BCPVA VIAs – be sure to click the links to read about the innovative products these five companies announced at NAB 2011.
The BC Professional Videographers Association is proud to present 2011 VIA awards to the following companies:

Adobe – Adobe Production Premium CS5.5

2011 BCPVA Video Innovation Award

Ginna Baldassarre, Adobe Sr. Product Manager and Bill Roberts, Adobe Director of Product Managament, with 2011 BCPVA Video Innovation Award for Adobe Production Premium CS5.5

Atomos – Atomos Ninja

2011 BCPVA Video Innovation Award at NAB 2011

Atomos founders Jeromy Young and Ian Overliese with 2011 BCPVA VIA Award

Blackmagic Design – ATEM Television Studio

ATEM Television Studio Award

Grant Petty, CEO of Blackmagic Design, with 2011 BCPVA VIA Award

K-Tek – Norbert Sport

K-Tek Norbert Sport wins 2011 BCPVA VIA Award

K-Tek President Brenda Parker with 2011 BCPVA VIA award

Sony – NEX-FS100

Sony NAB Award - 2011 BCPVA VIA

Jeff Ibbotson, Sony Senior Vice President, Professional Solutions Group with 2011 BCPVA VIA

The BCPVA Video Innovation Award was awarded by BCPVA delegate and Past-President, Shawn Lam, at NAB 2011.  VIAs were awarded to companies who have released new products that are game-changers for corporate and event video producers.  In order for products to be eligible, a pre-production or production model must be demonstrated at NAB.  Awards are judged according to the following criteria:

Features/Performance
Innovation/Uniqueness
Price/Value

Congratulations to all the 2011 BCPVA VIA winners

Shawn Lam presents Atomos with 2011 BCPVA VIA award

Las Vegas, Nevada, April 15, 2011
The British Columbia Professional Videographers Association is proud to present Atomos with the 2011 BCPVA Video Innovation Award for the Atomos Ninja.

The 2011 BCPVA VIA was presented to Atomos founders, Jeromy Young and Ian Overliese, by BCPVA delegate Shawn Lam, at NAB 2011.

The Atomos Ninja is a portable touchscreen Professional 10bit HD Recorder, Monitor, & Playback device that captures video and audio direct from any camera with a clean HDMI output. It encodes in real-time to the Apple ProRes format, onto removable laptop or solid state 2½ inch hard drives. The Ninja has dual hot-swappable battery slots, allowing for continuous power, and includes a Firewire800 and USB2.0/3.0 dock for fast transfer speeds. The Atomos Ninja is $995 USD and is aready shipping.

Atomos Ninja at NAB 2011

Atomos Ninja front view showing 4.3" 480x270 screen

Atomos Ninja case

2011 BCPVA VIA award winning Atomos Ninja in case

2011 BCPVA Video Innovation Award at NAB 2011

Atomos founders Jeromy Young and Ian Overliese with BCPVA VIA Award

Atomos Ninja at NAB 2011

Atomos Ninja at NAB 2011

Dual batteries allow for continuous power for Atomos Ninja

Shawn Lam presents Sony with 2011 BCPVA VIA award

Las Vegas, Nevada, April 12, 2011
The British Columbia Professional Videographers Association is proud to present Sony with the 2011 BCPVA Video Innovation Award for the Sony NEX-FS100.

The 2011 BCPVA VIA was presented to Jeff Ibbotson, Senior Vice President, Professional Solutions Group, by BCPVA delegate Shawn Lam, at NAB 2011.

The NEX FS100 is a super 35 sensor interchangeable lens HD video camera with professional XLR audio inputs.  The super 35 sensor allows the FS100 to attain superior low light sensitivity and a sought-after bokeh, or defocus.  The FS-100 improves on the problems that DSLR camera operators have been limited by, including moiré, aliasing, rolling shutter, 12 minute record limits, lack of data-display-less HDMI record out, and egonomics.

Jeff Ibbotson, Sony VP, with 2011 VIA

Sony wins 2011 BCPVA VIA at NAB 2011

Sony NXCAM super 35mm video camera

Super 35mm Sony NEX-FS100 video camera

Shawn Lam is the President of Shawn Lam Video Inc., a Vancouver Video Production company specializing in corporate and live event video production.

Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 review by Shawn Lam

Monday April 11, 2011 – Las Vegas, NV

Today Adobe announced a updates to much of their Creative Suite, including Production Premium, with CS5.5. So while many news sites are simply listing off the highlights from Adobe’s Press Release, I just published the first comprehensive review of Production Premium CS5.5, including Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5, on EventDV.

Premiere Pro CS5.5

Adobe Production Premium CS5.5

Overall I’m very pleased with CS5.5.  Despite its .5 name, Premiere Pro received a full update and my tests show that CS5.5 is faster than CS5 (see my CS5 review here) when enabling GPU acceleration while using an approved NVIDIA Cuda card.

In my After Effects CS5.5 review, I tested the Warp Stabilizer and Camera Blur feature.  You can watch the After Effects Cs5.5 Warp Stabilizer video here.

Shawn Lam featured on NVIDIA blog

I just got an email from the Senior PR Manager at NVIDIA to let me know that my EventDV coverage of NVIDIA during The NAB Show with Shawn Lam was featured in their latest blog post, summarizing their activities at NAB 2010.

Here are the notes he sent in his press release pertaining to my coverage in Part 1:

The NAB Show with Shawn Lam: Part One

Notes on video:

  • Lam interviews Adobe’s Simon Hayhurst, starting at the 4:45 mark;
  • @ the 5:35 mark, Hayhurst deep dives into CPU (aka “Oh my god it’s a disaster” slow performance) vs. (@ 5: 47 mark) GPU (aka “Oh my god in real-time” fast performance and acceleration);
  • Lam segues into his NVIDIA interview with Joe Stam @ the 7:12 mark; Stam picks up where Hayhurst left off by elaborating further on what the GPU brings to PPRO CS5 users. As Lam summarizes, “Sounds like it’s a whole new world of speed now with NVIDIA using their CUDA technology.”

Here is the link to NVIDIA blog post.

The NAB show with Shawn Lam, on EventDV

Last week I was in Las Vegas covering NAB 2010 for EventDV.  I had the opportunity to attend several video industry evening events in addition to working the trade show floor, gathering interviews for my show.  This isn’t the first time I’ve been hired as a roving reporter for EventDV – the first was at WEVA 2009, when I produced a 3 part series – and while I’m much more comfortable behind the camera as in front of it, I had a lot of fun in this role.

You can watch the NAB show with Shawn Lam, sponsored by proDAD here:

EventDV coverage of NAB 2010

The NAB show with Shawn Lam, sponsored by proDAD

Episode Guide:

Part One of The NAB Show With Shawn Lam features exclusive interviews with proDAD, Adobe, NVIDIA, Matrox, Blackmagic Design, and the organizers of the much-anticipated All-In film charity poker event.

In Part Two of the NAB Show With Shawn Lam, Shawn catches up with video switcher/mixer manufacturers Edirol, Datavideo, and NewTek; converter suppliers Atlona and AJA; intercom systems provider Clear-Com; and EventDV 25 all-star event filmmaker Kevin Shanihian at the world premiere of his game-changing film, City of Lakes.

Part Three of the NAB Show With Shawn Lam brings Shawn face to face with camera manufacturer mainstays Panasonic, Canon, and Sony, plus tripod-and-fluidhead headliners Manfrotto and Vinten. (Watch for a cameo by WEVA Diva Brooke Rudnick in the Sony segment!)

NAB 2010 Preview – Canon XF300 & XF305

NAB 2010 is just around the corner – April 12-15. Like most video enthusiasts, I’m excited to hear and find our about all the new announcements. And nothing gets a video guy more excited than a camera announcement. It makes sense – the video camera is the single most important piece of equipment that defines and categorizes (and restricts) a videographer and video video producer.

I have to admit my first trip to NAB, last year for NAB 2009, lacked some excitement when it came to video cameras. Panasonic had the HMC150 and Sony released new versions of 2008 cameras but these were largely overshadowed by DSLR mania. Well as of a few minutes ago, Canon has set the NAB 2010 bar really high with the announcement of the XF300 and XF305 (click for link to press release).

I’ve already got my interview scheduled with Canon for Thursday morning at NAB and am looking forward to reviewing these new cameras when they are released in June 2010.

Here are the highlights:
Canon will utilize CMOS sensors for the first time in a video camera of this class. No word on the size but considering the resolution 1/2″ is likely. This Canon link shows the CMOS sensor will be 1/3″.

CF card is the only record option.  2 hot-swappable slots are built in – no external recorder required.  I consider this a step-up from the Sony CF recorder as it only has one slot so record times are limited to 2.5 hours on a 32GB card.  A hot-swappable feature removed the continuous record time limit, especially important when recording at 4:2:2 at 50 Mbps.

The codec will be a new Canon XF codec with the following resolutions:

Mode Resolution Frame Rate
50Mbps (CBR) 4:2:2 1920 x1080 60i/30p/24p
1280 x 720 60p/30p/24p
35Mbps (VBR) 4:2:0 1920 x1080 60i/30p/24p
1280 x 720 60p/30p/24p
25Mbps (CBR) 4:2:0 1440 x1080 60i/30p/24p

The lens is a 18x HD L-series lens with a 35mm equivalent zoom range of 29.3 – 527.4mm and a Full Manual Focus mode with mechanical “hard” end stops and distance markers for professional operability and repeatable manual focus.

Canon’s XF305 Professional Camcorder is scheduled to be available in late June for an estimated retail price of ,999. Canon’s XF300 Professional Camcorder is scheduled to be available in late June for an estimated retail price of ,799.

It looks like the main difference between the two models is summed-up in this part of the press release:

Canon’s XF305 model features industry- standard HD-SDI output, genlock, and SMPTE time code (in/out) terminals for multi-camera or 3-D productions.

So the XF305 is 3D ready!

Canon HD video camera
Canon XF305 – NAB 2010
Canon HD video camera
Front view of Canon XF305 – 3D ready professional video camera.

Shawn Lam to attend NAB 2009

The NAB Show – the National Association of Broadcaster’s annual digital media industry event for audio, video, film, and communications professionals, is the world’s largest electronic media show. The exhibits at the trade show will take place between April 20-23, 2009 at the Las Vegas Convention Center.

I’m planning on attending this trade show of trade shows for the first time to visit my usual favourites who I follow closely for my own business needs – Sony, Matrox, Vitec Group (Vinten, Manfrotto, Sachtler), Adobe, and Focus Enhancements (Firestore).

What I’m most looking forward to are some of the alternative and smaller suppliers to see what innovative and unique technologies and tools they have that I might be able to use in my business.